Posts Tagged ‘settlement’

Classmates.com $9.5 million settlement

March 14, 2010

I just posted about the latest privacy suit filed against Classmates.com a few days ago and now news of this.  The company is being forced to pay for its practices of enticing potential customers to sign up for a subscription to Classmates.com by telling them that a long lost schoolmate was trying to contact them only to find out after they had paid for membership, that there was no such interested person.  The settlement has two parts: you get a two dollar credit to purchase further services or a renewal or a three dollar cash payout. 

Not surprisingly, the company is not admitting any wrongdoing.

Coincidentally, the company’s president, Steven B. McArthur left the Classmates.com’s employment two weeks ago.

Unclear how Facebook settlement will impact Texas litigation

October 26, 2009

Here is an explanation for what may have happen to the Texas suits where Facebook was added as a defendant earlier this month.  It still sounds like a settlement is likely for those filing but how that might happen isn’t at all straigthforward

Article:

Footware makers settles injury claims

July 27, 2009

“Financially troubled footwear maker Crocs, Inc. has recently settled at least five design defect lawsuits rather than contest allegations that its popular foam rubber clogs are unsafe for children to wear on moving escalators.”

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Norton anti-virus class action settlement

April 30, 2009

“If you purchased a Norton Anti-virus product between December 2001 and October of last year, you may be entitled to some money. Symantec has agreed to give those users a $15 voucher for a future purchase or $2.50 in cash. A class action suit alleged the company unlawfully terminated subscription time when consumers purchase upgrades. The plaintiffs demanded a credit or refund for that unused time, and there has been no admission of guilt.”

Article

Scientology dentist settles harassment suit

January 14, 2009

This Chicago Scientologist dentist sexual harassed and discriminated against 18 of his employees and required workers “to engage in Scientology religious practices and learn about Scientology as conditions of their employment.”

He is being forced to fork over $462,000 to settle these claims and he is legally prohibited from engaging in these acts again.  However, this consent decree doesn’t include an admission of guilt by the defendant.  Why is that? 

Months ago I posted here about another Scientologist dentist who was sued for forcing his office manager to attend Scientology trainings.

Article

Wal-Mart’s $640 million wage case settlement

December 24, 2008

“Many of these lawsuits were filed years ago and the allegations are not representative of the company we are today,”

Oh really?  Looking at the list of cases I see more than a dozen were filed in 2007 and a significant number filed also in 2006.   Looking at Wal-Mart’s most recent 10-Q, they mention that, “The Company cannot reasonably estimate the possible loss or range of loss that may arise from these lawsuits”[except where they had already settled a few of these cases]. I guess they were able to estimate their losses after all. 

In the New York Times article, lawyers theorized that this is a way to turn the page for the incoming CEO, Lee Scott on an embarrassing past.   With a new, progressive administration and a wave of populist sentiment borne of the financial markets debacle, it might also be an excellent time to recreate Wal-Mart’s image.  Next up, Wal-Mart as a union shop.   Hah!

740,000 get checks from Wachovia

December 18, 2008

And why is that you might ask?  Its seems that the now defunct bank, allowed telemarketers to access customer accounts in payment for products and services not authorized by the consumer.

Each consumer so afflict will get a settlement of $149.  Merry Xmas.

Article

FTC settles Canadian calling card scam

December 10, 2008

I thought they were real nice up there!  Seems that these telemarketers would convince consumers to purchase a trial long distance calling card for a dollar, never actually send the card but keep charging their credit card with $19.95 activation and $49.95 monthly fees.

The FTC settled this litigation by barring the Canadians from these cross-border phone raids into the U.S.  Prey on  your own citizens!

News release